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Character Development: Self-Inserts

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Anonymous asked:

Hello! Your blog is an inspiration and I'm really grateful you take the time to answer these asks! If it's not too much trouble, could you clarify the difference between "writing what you know" and self-insert stories? Thanks so much!!

Thanks! <3

Writing what you know means incorporating your knowledge and experiences into a character who is not you or any alternate version of you. Self-insert stories are where you make yourself into a character—even if you change some of your features and attributes, you think of that character as being you, and of yourself as being that character. :)

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deathbright asked:

Hello, I have a question (No duh). I've writen a bit, but something isn't right. I think I need a time skip. How do you know when that is the right then to do?

If you come to a place where nothing else important is going to happen for minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, years, then you do a time skip. :) You can read my post Accounting for Lost Time in Scene Transitions for more information. :)

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Anonymous asked:

Is it okay to write a story with just dialogue? I'm not talking a full-length novel or novella because that is certainly too much, but... actually, if it is okay, what's the longest length you recommend?

Even in a short story, it’s best to include some action and description. Stories that are all dialogue tend to end up like a literary tennis match with all that talking back and forth. :)

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caffeinatedfantasy asked:

I have a story where an American in living in Japan and is switches between English and Japanese fairly often throughout the story. What would be the best way to indicate the differences when speaking or reading without explicitly saying "And she said in English" or "And she said in Japanese".

Outside of actually using the different languages (which I wouldn’t recommend, obviously), there’s no other way to indicate a switch but to be honest about it. This is why it’s fundamentally tricky to write a story where your character is switching between languages quite often. You can get creative and find subtle variations in how you state it, but that’s about it. One thing that will help is to refrain from doing this language switching back-and-forth within the same set of dialogue. That just gets confusing and the constant explanation will be tiring. If they stick to one language in a conversation, you can clarify once what language is being spoken and the reader should understand that’s the language being spoken the rest of the time. If you absolutely have to switch in the middle of a set of dialogue, limit the it to two or three times within that set and in no more than a few sets in the story.

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Anonymous asked:

hey i have a question that might sound a little bit stupid but i am writing a novel right now (at least i started one) and i'm stuck at the beginning because my story has to start with the death of the main characters parents. My problem is that i have no idea how to write that. What happens after a death in family? I hope you can understand this :/

It’s not a stupid question, but it is a rather broad one. What happens after a death in the family is dependent upon the time period, location, culture, religion, and situation of the family. Added to that is the fact that individual reactions to a family death vary from person to person. So, unfortunately, I can’t give you an answer to your question, but you can plug some keywords related to your family (their nationality, the time period they live in, their culture, religion, etc.) into a phrase like “how Chinese families handle a death in the family” or “how 20th century Italian families handled death in the family.” Just keep trying different combinations of words and phrases and you should start to find some resources that will help you refine your search terms. :)

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Anonymous asked:

This is a pretty strange question, but I have a character who grew up with three close friends. This character holds a position of high power, and his friends are subordinates. They look up to him in a way that implies romantic love. While these characters don't pursue a relationship with him for various reasons, I hope portray their love for him in subtle ways while remaining realistic. It doesn't help much that this character already has a love interest of his own... Love square???

Well, not a “love square” because there are five people. Your MC, the three subordinates who love him, and then his love interest. I’m not sure there’s a name for that, to be honest, but it isn’t really necessary to classify every romantic story in that way, so I wouldn’t worry about it. :)

Tagged with

#wqaff

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Featured Friday #8

Don’t forget to send in your submissions for Featured Friday!

You can send any of the following:

  • a link to something you’ve written that you want to share. This includes comics, graphics novels, poetry, essays, and song lyrics. The link can be to your tumblr, writing blog, web site, or any other place where your writing is shared or hosted, however, no “adult” web sites please. :)

  • a link to your novel/graphic novel/comic for sale on your web site, Amazon, or any other web site.

  • a link to your book trailer or other book-related promotion

  • a link to your author blog/web site, book blog/web site, writing blog/web site, writing help blog/web site


Remember: these should be links to your creations. :) 

You can submit here.

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Advice: Making Up an Historical Event